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20110331
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growing concern about the bombing of rebel-held areas by gaddafi's forces, there are voices in the u.s. and europe calling for the rebels to be armed to directly. it sounds simple, but history offers plenty of cautionary tales. in a moment, we will hear whether senator john mccain thinks it is a good idea. >> what i am calling for is a greater access for the libyan opposition forces for weaponry. >> there is no guarantee that by helping these people, you necessarily bring about a more democratic outcome or more desirable outcome. >> the question is, what kind of arms with a supply? whom would supply them? britain session -- britain's special forces may have suffered a setback last week in libya. but the momentum is still building in the west for military intervention of some kind, including perhaps arm the rebels. in libya, repeated bombing by government warplanes around the rebel-held oil town of ras lanuf marks colonel gaddafi's drive in his country. opposition forces are determined, but still lack a clear organization or command structure. the worst violence was reported near tripol
and france and the u.s. want gaddafi to go and face trial for war crimes and for libyans to work towards choosing a new and more open system of government. libyan television shows casualty victims injured in plane strikes. but it cannot be clairefied. >> the last official figure that we've. the rebels in their vehicles return. they are -- they have now returned. the rebels on one set -- side of ben jawad and they are using a large amount of rockets, firing them into and over the town of the gaddafi forces, and the gaddafi forces are replying with ar tilly. >> all right, nick. thank you for that update. >> let's speak to our world affairs correspondent in the capital now. as you know we've got this london conference about to get under way this afternoon. what, if any, has been the reaction to the conference in tripoli? >> well, colonel gaddafi has sent out a letter, strangely unreported here, to the american congress and european parolments and various other people appealing to them to stop what he calls the crusader aggression. the letter says civilians here have been killed by the crusa
with the battle -- the bbc middle east. it starts with jeremy bowen in london. >> the u.s. jets returning to their base in italy. the decision to use air power against colonel gadhafi in libya was taken quickly, so quickly that they are still sorting out the politics behind it. if that is one reason for the london conference, assembling ministers and diplomats from 40 countries, and the arab league and the african union to back u.n. resolutions. though thertheir enthusiasm for military action varies. the mandate to protect civilians also means taking sides in a civil war. >> we made the right choice, that was to draw a line in the desert sand to halt the murderous advance of gaddafi's forces. no one has yet to explain when or how that commitment ends. the conference also said -- started the process toward more legitimacy. this is the closest of rebels have to a political leadership and would like more help on the ground, too. >> the americans said they would consider arming the rebels. is that something you would like? >> you can see that they are fighting with machine guns, etc. >> the u
will not be defeated. further air strikes have been taking place in the u.s. secretary of state has been suggested in that aids for khaddafi may be looking for a way out. >> angry and characteristically defiant, colonel gaddafi appeared to be in the compound targeted by an allied missile on the first night. for the supporters with him and watching, he said that he would keep on fighting against libyan rebels and the international forces. he said that he is not afraid. he said that he is the fiat, his home is here, and he is here. colonel gaddafi has pledged that there will be no surrender. the revolution for imperialism came on another night when there was fire around the capital. here bringing traffic into the streets rather than heading for cover. from hillary clinton comes the suggestion that gaddafi might be looking for an exit strategy. >> i am not aware of his personally reaching out but i do know of people allegedly on his behalf reaching out. this is a very dynamic situation. >> diplomatic strategies are being pursued to convince the libyan leader to take another course. these pictures pro
. president obama said today military options are still on the table. there are signs the u.s. might go along with a resolution if there is a consensus. we are seeing how people feel about foreign intervention. >> all over benghazi, there are posters say no foreign intervention is needed to help the people rid themselves of colonel gaddafi. if there clear about that. after several days of attacking protestors strongholds, several towns in the west, the town of ras lanuf, the rebels thought they had captured that themselves, only now are they beginning to change their mind. would you accept foreign help now? >> yes. the no-fly zone would be very welcome. the surgical bombings -- where he has his supporters. some other bases where he has his troops, we do not mind surgical bombing there. we did not mind a no-fly zone over libya because he is using his aircraft to kill people. they have no cover for that. we can match them on the ground, but in the skies, we have no power. we would welcome very much a no flying zone over libya. but no foreign troops on the ground. a no-fly zone would be enough.
the obama administration is not moving forward asking for a no-fly zone from the u.s. congress or the un security council. there have been democrats and republicans pushing the obama administration to consider a no- fly zone. senator john kerry called for one, which follows lieberman and mccain. pretty much the entire spectrum has been pushing president obama to do more. i think secretary clinton and secretary gates have been trying to throw a little cold water on the idea, pointing out the risk s and consequences of such a decision. >> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has said that all options are on the table when it comes to dealing with libya and dealing with colonel gaddafi. what is your sense of what that means? is it rhetoric? is their intent behind that? >> one would hope there's intent behind that. both the united states and european capitals have said that gaddafi must go now and they have imposed these sanctions. so far, there's been no real action. we have our navy off the coast of libya right now, but with no apparent course of taking action. we've heard about the ris
for debate, not action. u.s. secretary of state has insisted that this be a u.n., not american initiative. protesters are keeping a low profile in at the capitol. but the protesters still seem determined to fight. >> only 30 miles away from the wyatt, the military success makes it even more dangerous -- from zawiya, the military success makes it even more dangerous for protesters. they believe in former is are everywhere. yet another protester joined us. they have never been on facebook before, which is now blocked. they do not have weapons, unlike the rebels in zawiya. but many have died, too, killed by the regime. >> jeremy. >> do you think because of the force that he has used -- >> no, and he is not finished. i will never speak any words with -- i am not arab. >> what is your gut feeling, like your feeling inside about how this is killing two and? >> we do not want this to go on. >> so, how do you beat him? >> how we will be? with faith. that is the only way. we don't have guns or modules or anything. but we have faith. we have the faith to be free people. >> how do you sustain this?
you can't ask for unmanned drones from the u.s. what else would you need, particularly from the iaea? >> i believe we have been asking for help from the iea -- iaea and from the united states. we will require and we will ask for assistance as needed. we will not hesitate to ask for help if we feel it is necessary. >> in terms of the humanitarian situation, what is your assessment of how that is progressing? how are you getting essentials supplies for those in such desperate need, bearing in mind that weather conditions and the nuclear situation on going? >> i believe the earthquake itself, magnitude 9.0, unprecedented. many of the roads, land communications are destroyed. our immediate response was sending in almost 80,000 troops and rescue forces to rescue people. we succeeded in rescuing 26,000 people. now, as you say, the issue of how to support and released those displaced, -- and rel ieve those displaced, that is a concern for us. we set up headquarters at the ministerial level to address this issue quickly. we are using our forces to send in necessary material. take an example
. we are ok. no problem. >> in the east, the air campaign had its first loss, a u.s. air force eagle jetfighter crashed in rebel territory. the alliance says it wasn't shot down but suffered mechanical failure. its two crewmen have been rescued. east of tripoli, the fight for control of the city goes on. rebel forces were enjoying a moment of celebration. then this. how quickly the moment turned to panic and retreat. >> the condition is so serious. since last night, they have no lights, electricity in the hospital. they're working with generators. yesterday it was disaster because more than 22 missiles. >> 1973 pact, no one to die. >> no one died last night. the libyan government insists they will swear many civilians have been killed and wounded by allied strikes t might well be true. we have asked them for evidence. so far, they have not provided it. bbc news, tripoli. >> the american admiral leading the international operation to enforce the no-fly zone has said gaddafi loyalists are still attacking civilians and coalitions are considering options to stop that. on a diplomatic lev
the libyan air force and no longer exists as a fighting force. the senior u.s. commander says that troops loyal to gaddafi are still violating a u.n. resolution 1973. misrata is besieged by government tanks and artillery. mike will reject reports. >> characteristically the finance -- define it, colonel gaddafi on the first night of bombing. he said that those attacking libya would end up in the dustbin of history. colonel gaddafi has pledged there would be no surrender, and this on another night with a burst of anti-aircraft fire. from the american secretary of state hillary clinton, a suggestion that efforts might be under way to look for an exit strategy. >> i am not aware that he personally has reached out, but i know people allegedly on his behalf up and reaching out. that is why i say this is a very dynamic situation. >> be diplomatic strategy has been to convince the libyan leader to take another course. these pictures provide more insight into the military reality confronting him and his forces. it shows as helicopters taking off for an operation at night with american ships involv
, both before and after the u.s.-led invasion of 2001. and from 1991 to 1993 he was the foreign minister of algeria. he is currently a distinguished fellow at the london school of economics. he is one of the elders, a group of eminent global leaders brought together by nelson mandela to try to solve the world's problems-- or at least offer some advice. i am pleased to have him back on this program. welcome back. >> thank you very much. it's good to be here. >> rose: so let's just start with the obvious. what kind of advice should you be offering and the group of elders about change in the middle east? >> you know, this change is definitely taking place. it is the work of the people of the region of the different countries. there is a lesson of humility there. nobody has predicted how and when it was going to happen. >> rose: or that it was. >> that it was going to happen. nor the order in which it's happening. so i think we... if we learn that lesson of humility, that's already a great contribution. the second thing is, you know, in places like tunisia and egypt they have been facing the
to his people. i also have stated that it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go go. and we've got a wide range of tools in our military efforts to support that policy. we were very rapid in initiating unilateral sanctions and then helping to mobilize international sanctions against the qaddafi regime. >> rose: joining me now from the eastern city of tobruk is richard engel, chief foreign correspondent for nbc news. >> it's a pleasure, charlie. >> rose: what's your sense of this war? what factors on the ground influence the way you see it? >> the rebels here obviously are very excited that they finally have international support, particularly american support they feel that they have suddenly been recognized by the greatest military in the world, the u.s. military, and that army and air strikes and naval strikes will carry them to tripoli. i'm not sure if that's what the intended message is from the united states but it's how it's been perceived here and the rebel strategy seems to be allow the air strikes to continue to decimate qaddafi's army and they can do this very slow march
-- to determine the location of the deceased. >> but teams from a number of nations, including the u.k., the u.s.a., japan, taiwan, korea, china, new zealand -- they typically work in their own national units. where possible we have tried but teams and in areas where they can focus on places we know some of their countrymen are liable to be located. they work on a shift roster. they do 30 minutes on, 30 minutes all. they rotate. they're the most amazing, dedicated people. they have reduced risk to a minimum. risk that would be beyond anything we would normally accept in our lives. and they have focused on one thing -- with great optimism and a degree of hope he reads from the beginning -- and they still have that now. they still think light of the book may be somewhere." and that is the way they work. >> the latest headlines for you this hour. the libyan air force claims they are launching a new attack and in eastern libya. gaddafi is being investigated for possible crimes against humanity. president obama is sending aircraft to aid refugees fleeing libya peary had hundreds more -- fleeing libya
in yemen, but the president tells the u.s. to stop interfering. and he is known for shaquita andino -- shocking o on the catwalk, but dior has fired john galliano. hello again. in libya, colonel gaddafi is making efforts to shore up areas around capital of tripoli. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton is warning that the country could go into a protracted civil war. jeremy bowen says that gaddafi says there are no demonstrations against him, and jeremy has a different account of how peaceful the city is. >> colonel gaddafi supporters were in the town to wave off the convoy. they say his authority will be restored. >> forever. forever. >> the regime's power is concentrated in the capital. colonel gaddafi has genuine support here, but there are protesters in tripoli, too. this is the center of the city, and green square. authorities say the foreign media has not been showing signs like these because they are wrongly portrayed in libya as chaotic and violent. here in tripoli, it is not normal, and if they thought there wasn't any chance of a violent regime change, they would not be
in the earthquake and tsunami a week ago. the u.s. president barack obama has said the libyan leader colonel gaddafi must obey the u.n. demands or face military action. earlier, the libyan government announced an immediate ceasefire and promised to follow the u.n. resolution passed on thursday. he said colonel gaddafi had to stop all attacks on civilians, pull back his troops, and allow in humanitarian aid. >> now once more, muammar gaddafi has a choice. the resolution that passed lays out very clear conditions that must be met. the united states, the united kingdom, france, and arab states agree that a cease-fire must be implemented immediately. that means all attacks against civilians must stop. gaddafi must stop his troops from advancing on benghazi. he must pull them back from misurata and established water, gas, and electricity supplies to all areas. humanitarian assistance must be allowed to reach the people of libya. let me be clear. these terms are not negotiable. >> in the libyan capital of tripoli, there is dismay and anger at the u.n. decision. many see the rebellion as a criminal
. bbc news, tripoli. >> the general in charge of u.s. africa demand, leading coalition operations in libya, and said he does not expect operations to continue much longer. >> i do not think it will go on for very long time. and we have an opportunity to execute the requirements of the u.n. security council resolution. the most important part of which is to protect civilians. it is important to note with the net to a large degree by stopping the regime's attacks on benghazi. there are other places where civilians remain threatened by the regime. we are doing our best each and every day and night to protect the civilians. >> you are watching "bbc world news." still to come on the program -- more worries in japan around the fukushima nuclear plant. one of the reactors could be damaged. the countries involved and the military coalition over libya have been financing a deal to transfer political control of their campaign -- finessing a deal to transfer political control of their campaign to nato. matthew price reports. >> slowly, but surely, it is being transferred to nato. command rem
't make the mistake that the u.s. made in iraq. he didn't dismantle the military completely. >> rose: he dismantled the leadership. >> and brought in a new cadre of officers. and then he did something else. gradually he built a parallel military called the islamic revolutionary guard corps, the i.r.g.c. and with every passing year he strengthened them to the dret remit of the military. so we now have two military, one that is significant. >> so tell me your picture of iran today. i mean khamenei is the supreme leader. >> khamenei is the supreme leader. i think his space of power is essentially the i.r.g.c., the revolutionary guards. >> rose: and they're more loyal to him than they are to ahmadinejad or anyone else? >> they are more loyal to themselves, i think, right now because... >> rose: they're the power center. >> they're the power center. they've become an economic juggernaut. >> rose: they own things. >> they own about half the country. literally about half of the economy. >> rose: so therefore, it is argued, that sanctions can have an impact because sanctions can deny them their
in aid from the u.s. as ronald reagan, which joined dozens of japanese vessels and will be a base to deliver supplies to camps in the stricken areas. other american warships are on the way or standing by. at the request of the japanese government, seasons and rescue teams from california and virginia arrived on sunday with tracker dogs to help search for survivors. their last international deployment was a year ago in the aftermath of the haiti earthquake. the 75-person unit consists of doctors, paramedics, engineers, and firefighters and have enough food and water to make them self-sufficient for 10 days. and the fund raising has also begun. with international charities calling for the millions of dollars that will be needed in the months and years ahead. jane o'brien, bbc news, washington. >> for more on the disaster in japan, go to the bbc website of the latest news and analysis, including aerial views. bbc.com/news. you are watching world news today from bbc world news would need, -- these are had guns. technicians in japan battled to coal overheating nuclear reactors at the f
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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